Z SQUARE 7, A B-29 TRUE STORY

American Battle Monuments Commission - Memorials

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Z Square 7 Crew Families
Z Square 7 Crew Cemeteries.
Missing Air Crew Report
Z Square 7 Crew Military Funeral
Memorial Lt Eugene M. Thomas Jr (Marion, Al)
Memorial Lt Francis X. Glacken (Cambridge, MA)
Memorial Lt Norman B. Bassett (Cornell University, Ithaca, NY)
Marcia Bassett McGrattan
Memorial Sgt George P. Demers (Lynn, MA)
Memorial Sgt George P. Demers (Lynn, MA)
Peter & Lillian Demers/Charlotte (Demers) Fiasconaro
Memorial Sgt Louis A. Dorio (Clarksville, VA)
HIRE OUR VETERANS!
POW-MIA-KIA Ceremony
500th Bomb Group, 73rd Wing Honor Roll
Bill Mauldin With Willie And Joe
Father John McBride
S/Sgt Kenneth O. Eslick with Photo Album
Sgt Jesse S. Klein. 41-13180
Frank Farr & Merseburg, Germany
"Lili Marlene" The Song!
"Lili Marlene" The B-17
"Lily Marlene" The B-24
"Lili Marlene" The B-24
Ivan Fail Introduction and "Long Before The Guns And Tanks."
Ivan Fail's "Tribute to the Queen"
American Battle Monuments Commission - Cemeteries
American Battle Monuments Commission - Memorials
NATIONAL WORLD WAR II MEMORIAL
THE MARINE CORPS WAR MEMORIAL (IWO JIMA )
KOREAN WAR VETERANS MEMORIAL
VIETNAM VETERANS MEMORIAL
M/Sgt Roy P. Benavidez, Vietnam Medal Of Honor
Frank Farr Poetry "November 2, 1944", "Old Men And The War", " Merseburg"
Some Pictures of World War 2
Zachary Taylor Nat'l Cemetery Memorial Pages Introduction
Zachary Taylor Nat'l Cemetery Memorial Crew Index
Zachary Taylor Nat'l Cemetery Memorial Page 1
Zachary Taylor Nat'l Cemetery Memorial Page 2
Zachary Taylor Nat'l Cemetery Memorial Page 3
Zachary Taylor Nat'l Cemetery Memorial Page 4
Zachary Taylor Nat'l Cemetery Memorial Page 5
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Zachary Taylor Nat'l Cemetery Memorial Page 15
Zachary Taylor Nat'l Cemetery Memorial Page 16
Zachary Taylor Nat'l Cemetery Memorial Page 17
Zachary Taylor Nat'l Cemetery Memorial Page 18
Zachary Taylor Nat'l Cemetery Memorial Page 19
Zachary Taylor Nat'l Cemetery Memorial Page 20
Zachary Taylor Nat'l Cemetery Memorial Page 21
Zachary Taylor Nat'l Cemetery Memorial Page 22
Zachary Taylor Nat'l Cemetery Memorial Page 23
Zachary Taylor Nat'l Cemetery Memorial Page 24
Zachary Taylor Nat'l Cemetery Memorial Page 25
Zachary Taylor Nat'l Cemetery Memorial Page - B29 Superfortress
Zachary Taylor Nat'l Cemetery Memorial Page - B26 Marauder
Zachary Taylor Nat'l Cemetery Memorial Page - B25 Mitchell
Zachary Taylor Nat'l Cemetery Memorial Page - B24 Liberator
Zachary Taylor Nat'l Cemetery Memorial Page - B17 Flying Fortress
Zachary Taylor Nat'l Cemetery Memorial Page - C87 Liberator Express
Zachary Taylor Nat'l Cemetery Memorial Page - PBM-5 Mariner
Zachary Taylor Nat'l Cemetery Memorial Page - A20 Havoc Attack Bomber
Zachary Taylor Nat'l Cemetery Memorial Page - C47 Transport
Zachary Taylor Nat'l Cemetery Memorial Page - P61 Black Widow
Zachary Taylor Nat'l Cemetery Memorial Page - A26 Invader
GIVE OUR VETERANS JOBS!!
Ivan Fail's "The Tuskegee Airmen"
Airmen Medal Of Honor Memorial
Memorial Page #1
Memorial Page #2
Memorial Page #3
Memorial Page #4
Memorial Page #5
Memorial Page #6
The Navajo Code Talkers & Native American Medals Of Honor
Ivan Fail's "D Day, The Normandy Invasion"
B-29 Crew Positions & Specifications
About The Book
C. Clayton Thompson Bookseller
Ivan Fail's "When The Mustangs Came"
Contacts
Ivan Fail "The Eighteen Wheeler's Hymn"
Awards
Lompoc Veterans Memorial Building with photo album
Ivan Fail's "Against All Odds - Mission Complete"
Ford Tolbert by Sallyann
Ford Tolbert Pictures
A Tribute to Lt Raymond "Hap" Halloran
Lt Raymond "Hap" Halloran
Colonel Gregory "Pappy" Boyington, USMC, The Black Sheep Squadron
Lt Halloran Eulogy for Colonel Boyington
Omori POW Camp
Ivan Fail's "A Salute To Lt. Holguin"/ "Shoo Shoo Baby"
Great Bend, Kansas B-29 Memorial
General Lemay's biography including a B-29 nose art photo album
THE GENERAL AND MRS CURTIS LEMAY FOUNDATION
March 9 and 10, 1945 Over Tokyo
Lt "Hap" Halloran on March 10, 1945
General Earl Johnson
General Earl Johnson Biography
313th Bomb Wing Mining Missions
Lt Robert Copeland, copilot, Z Square 8
Pyote Bomber Base With A Photo Album
History of "Diamond Lil" With A Photo Album
History of "FIFI" With A Photo Album
"Hap" Halloran induction Combat Airman Hall of Fame
Blackie Blackburn with a photo album
Hap's Memorable Flight On FIFI
C. Douglas Caffey, A WW2 Veteran, Book Of Poetry
C. Douglas Caffey Collection Of Poetry
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C. Douglas Caffey on Post Traumatic Stress Disorder
C. Douglas Caffey With More on PTSD
C. Douglas Caffey Memorial Day Flying The Flag
C. Douglas Caffey Saying Goodbye To America
OUR VETERANS NEED WORK!
Pearl Harbor with Photo Album
The Pacific Theater
Battle of Saipan, Mariana Islands
Saipan Medals of Honor
Battle of Tinian, Mariana Islands
Tinian Medals of Honor
Battle of Guam, Mariana Islands
Guam Medals of Honor
Battle of Iwo Jima
Iwo Jima Medals of Honor
Cpl Ira Hayes, USMC
Battle of Okinawa
Okinawa Medals of Honor
Japanese Surrender
Navy Ships At Surrender Ceremonies
Ivan Fail's "The Saga Of The Superfortress"
Ivan Fail's "The Silent Sentries"
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Memorials

Audenarde Monument

The World War I Audenarde American Monument is located in the town of Oudenaarde (Audenarde), Belgium, 18 miles south of Gent (Gand), 45 miles west of Brussels and 183 miles north of Paris, France.

The monument of golden-yellow limestone, bearing the shield of the United States flanked by two stone eagles, stands at the end of a small park maintained by the Commission.   It commemorates the service and sacrifice of the 40,000 American troops who, in October and November 1918, fought in the vicinity as units attached to the Group of Armies commanded by the King of Belgians.   Some are buried in Flanders Field American Cemetery at Waregem, Belgium, 10 miles to the west.

Belleau Wood Monument

Belleau Wood is located on the high ground to the rear of the Aisne-Marne American Cemetery and Memorial south of the village of Belleau (Aisne), France.   It contains many of the vestiges of World War I.   In the center of the road leading through the woods is a flagpole and a monument commemorating the valor of the United States Marines who captured this area in 1918.

Bellicourt Monument

The Bellicourt American Monument is nine miles north of St. Quentin (Aisne), France on the highway to Cambrai and one mile north of the village of Bellicourt.   It is 97 miles north of Paris and three miles from the Somme American Cemetery.   Erected above a canal tunnel built by Napoleon I, it commemorates the achievements and sacrifices of the 90,000 American troops who served in battle with the British Armies in France during 1917 and 1918.

The tunnel was one of the main defense features of the Hindenburg Line which was broken by the American troops in a brilliant offensive in September 1918.   Engraved on the rear facade of the memorial is a map illustrating the American operations; on the terrace is an orientation table.

Cabanatuan Memorial

The Cabanatuan American Memorial was erected by the survivors of the Bataan Death March and the prisoner of war camp at Cabanatuan in the Philippines during World War II.  It is located at the site of the camp and honors those Americans and Filipinos who died during their internment. The American Battle Monuments Commission, recognizing the significance of this memorial, accepted responsibility for its operation and maintenance in 1989.

Cantigny Monument

The World War I Cantigny American Monument is located in the village of Cantigny (Somme), France, about four miles northwest of Montdidier on route D-26 from Montdidier to Ailly-sur-Noye. It is about 66 miles north of Paris via Chantilly or Senlis.

This battlefield monument commemorates the first offensive operation by a large American unit in May 1918. It stands in the center of a village which was captured during that attack. The village was completely destroyed by artillery fire. The monument consists of a white stone shaft on a platform surrounded by an attractive park, developed and maintained by the Commission. The quiet surroundings now give no hint of the bitter hand to hand fighting which took place nearby many years ago.

Chateau-Thierry Monument

The World War I Chateau-Thierry American Monument is located on a hill two miles west of Chateau-Thierry, France.  It commands a wide view of the valley of the Marne River.  It is about 54 miles east of Paris, four and a half miles southeast of our Aisne-Marne American Cemetery and Memorial and 17 miles southwest of our Oise-Aisne American Cemetery and Memorial.  It commemorates the achievements of the American forces that fought in this region in World War I.  At the nearby cemeteries rest those Americans who gave their lives in the service of their country.  Two stone pylons mark the entrance from Highway N-3 running from Paris to Chateau-Thierry.

The monument consists of an impressive double colonnade rising above a long terrace.  On its west facade are heroic sculptured figures representing the United States and France.  On its east facade is a map showing American military operations in this region and an orientation table pointing out the significant battle sites.

Chaumont Marker

The World War I Chaumont Marker is a bronze plaque located at the entrance to Damremont Barracks, Chaumont, France.  It signifies the location of the General Headquarters of the American Expeditionary Forces of World War I commanded by General John J. Pershing.  Its inscription in French and English reads as follows:

GENERAL HEADQUARTERS
OF THE
AMERICAN EXPEDITIONARY FORCES
IN EUROPE DURING THE WORLD WAR
OCCUPIED THE BUILDING
OF THE CASERNE DAMREMONT
FROM SEPTEMBER 1, 1917 TO JULY 11, 1919
AND FROM HERE
DIRECTED THE ACTIVITIES OF MORE THAN
TWO MILLION AMERICAN SOLDIERS.

East Coast Memorial

The World War II East Coast Memorial is located in Battery Park in New York City at the southern end of Manhattan Island.  It is about 150 yards from the South Ferry subway station on the IRT Lines and overlooks the Statue of Liberty in New York Harbor.  It stands just south of historic Fort Clinton on a site furnished by the Department of Parks of the City of New York.

This memorial commemorates those soldiers, sailors, marines, coast guardsmen, merchant marines and airmen who met their deaths in the service of their country in the western waters of the Atlantic Ocean during World War II.  Its axis is oriented on the Statue of Liberty.  On each side of the axis are four gray granite pylons upon which are inscribed the name, rank, organization and state of each of the 4,609 missing in the waters of the Atlantic.

Guadalcanal Memorial

The World War II Guadalcanal American Memorial is located on Skyline Drive overlooking the town of Honiara, Guadalcanal, Solomon Islands. It was built through the joint efforts of the American Battle Monuments Commission and the Guadalcanal-Solomon Islands Memorial Commission.

It honors those Americans and its Allies who lost their lives during the Guadalcanal Campaign of World War II (August 7, 1942 to February 9, 1943). The memorial consists of a four-foot square, 24-foot tall pylon on which is inscribed:

THIS MEMORIAL HAS BEEN ERECTED BY THE
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
IN HUMBLE TRIBUTE TO ITS SONS AND ITS ALLIES
WHO PAID THE ULTIMATE SACRIFICE
FOR THE LIBERATION OF THE SOLOMON ISLANDS
1942 - 1943

There are four directional walls pointing to the four major battle areas. Inscribed on these walls are a description of the battles and a listing of the U.S. and Allied ships that were lost.

Honolulu Memorial

The Honolulu Memorial is located within the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in an extinct volcano near the center of the city at 2177 Puowaina Drive.

On either side of the grand stairs leading to the memorial are eight courts of the missing on which are inscribed the names of the 18,096 American World War II missing from the Pacific, excluding those from the southwest Pacific, and 8,200 American missing from the Korean War. Two half courts have been added at the foot of the staircase that contain the names of 2,504 Americans missing from the Vietnam War.  At the top of the stairs is a chapel flanked by galleries containing mosaic maps and descriptions of the achievements of the American armed forces in the Central and South Pacific regions and in Korea.

Kemmel Monument

The World War I Kemmel American Monument is six miles south of Ieper (Ypres), Belgium, near Vierstraat on the Kemmelberg (Mont Kemmel) Road overlooking the bitterly contested Ypres battlefield.  Ieper is 54 miles south of Ostend (Oostende), 76 miles west of Brussels and 165 north of Paris, France.  It is accessible by train.

This small monument on a low platform consists of a rectangular white stone block, in front of which is carved a soldier's helmet upon a wreath.  It commemorates the services and sacrifices of the American troops who, in the late summer of 1918, fought nearby in units attached to the British Army.  Some are buried in Flanders Field American Cemetery at Waregem, 10 miles to the west.

Montfaucon Monument

The World War I Montfaucon American Monument is located seven miles south of the Meuse-Argonne American Cemetery and Memorial and 20 miles northwest of Verdun.  It consists of a massive granite Doric column, surmounted by a statue symbolic of Liberty, which towers more than 200 feet above the war ruins of the former village.  It commemorates the American victory during the Meuse-Argonne Offensive during the period September 26, 1918 to November 11, 1918, when the American First Army forced the enemy to conduct a general retreat on this front.

On the walls of the foyer are an engraved map of the operations with a narrative and a special tribute to the American troops who served here.  The observation platform on top of the memorial is reached by 234 steps and affords magnificent views of this battlefield.

Montsec Monument

The World War I Montsec American Monument is located on the isolated hill of Montsec (Thiaucourt), France 12 miles southeast of our St. Mihiel American Cemetery and Memorial and 10 miles east of the town of St. Mihiel.  The entrance to the memorial's access road is immediately west of the center of Montsec Village.

This majestic monument, commemorating the achievements of the American soldiers who fought in this region in 1917 and 1918, dominates the landscape for miles around.  It consists of a classic circular colonnade with a broad approach stairway.  Within its center is a bronze relief map of the St. Mihiel salient, illustrating the military operations that took place there.  The monument was slightly damaged during World War II, but has been repaired.  From this vantage point the trenches used during the fighting can be seen.

Naval Brest Monument

The World War I Naval Monument at Brest, France stands on the ramparts of the city overlooking the harbor which was a major base of operations for American naval vessels during the war.  The original monument built on this site to commemorate the achievements of the United States Navy during World War I, was destroyed by the Germans on July 4, 1941, prior to the United States entry into World War II.   The present structure is a replica of the original and was completed in 1958.

The monument is a rectangular rose colored granite shaft rising 145 feet above the lower terrace and 100 feet above the Cours d'Ajot.   It sits upon a German bunker complex at the approximate site of the original monument.   All four sides of the monument are decorated with sculpture of naval interest.   The surrounding area has been developed by the Commission into an attractive park.  

Naval Gibraltar Monument

The World War I Naval Monument at Gibraltar is located at the Straits of Gibraltar, the gateway to the Mediterranean Sea.   It is a masonry archway which leads to a British Commonwealth War Graves Commission Cemetery.  Over the arch are two bronze seals of the United States and the Department of the Navy.   This monument, constructed of the stone from the neighboring "Rock," commemorates the achievements of the United States Navy in the nearby waters and its comradeship with the British Royal Navy during World War I.

From this monument, located in the midst of its historic surroundings, there is a flight of steps which connects the British naval establishments below with the cemetery and the picturesque town above. Gibraltar is a port of call for many ships.  A visit to the monument requires about half an hour from your arrival at Gibraltar.

Pointe du Hoc Monument

The World War II Pointe du Hoc Ranger Monument is located on a cliff eight miles west of Normandy American Cemetery and Memorial, which overlooks Omaha Beach.  It was erected by the French to honor elements of the American Second Ranger Battalion under the command of Lieutenant Colonel James E. Rudder.  During the American assault of Omaha Beach on June 6, 1944, these elements scaled the 100-foot cliff and seized the German artillery pieces that could have fired on the American landing troops at Omaha Beach.  At a high cost of life, they successfully defended against determined German counterattacks.

The monument consists of a simple granite pylon positioned atop a German concrete bunker with tablets at its base inscribed in French and English.  The monument was formally transferred to the American Battle Monuments Commission for perpetual care and maintenance on January 11, 1979.  This battle-scarred area on the left flank of Omaha Beach remains much as the Rangers left it.

Papua Marker

There is a bronze tablet located in the United States Chancellery in Papua, New Guinea paying homage to the sacrifice and achievements of the American Armed Forces in the Southwest Pacific region. Its inscription reads as follows:

THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
HONORS THE COURAGE AND SACRIFICE OF THE AMERICAN
FIGHTING UNITS WHO WITH OUR AUSTRALIAN
AND NEW ZEALAND ALLIES JOINED IN COMBAT
AGAINST A DETERMINED FOE HALF A CENTURY AGO.
PAPUAN AND NEW GUINEAN SERVICE UNITS,
THE ROYAL PAPUAN CONSTABULARY,
SCOUTS WAR-CARRIERS STOOD BRAVELY WITH THE ALLIES
TO STEM THE TIDE OF MILITARISM IN THE PACIFIC.
THE BONDS OF FRIENDSHIP FORGED HERE DURING WORLD WAR II
ENDURE TO THIS DAY.
THIS MONUMENT IS DEDICATED IN HUMBLE TRIBUTE
TO THE LEGACY OF FREEDOM SECURED FOR GENERATIONS
YET TO COME BY THOSE WHO FOUGHT FOR THE ALLIED CAUSE.

DEDICATED ON NOVEMBER 6, 1992, THE 50TH ANNIVERSARY OF
THE ARRIVAL OF GENERAL DOUGLAS MACARTHUR'S SOUTHWEST
PACIFIC AREA COMMAND IN PORT MORESBY.


Saipan Memorial

The World War II Saipan American Memorial is located near the beach overlooking Tanapag Harbor on the Island of Saipan, Commonwealth of the Mariana Islands.   It is a part of the American Memorial Park commemorating the Americans and Chamorro who died during the liberation of the Mariana Islands during World War II. Specifically, the memorial honors the 24,000 American marines and soldiers who died recapturing the islands of Saipan, Tinian and Guam during the period June 15, 1944 to August 11, 1944.
The memorial consists of a 12-foot rectangular obelisk of rose granite in a landscaped area of local flora and a 20-foot tower to the north enclosing a carillon. Inscribed on the monument is the following:


THIS MEMORIAL HAS BEEN ERECTED BY
THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
IN HUMBLE TRIBUTE TO ITS SONS
WHO PAID THE ULTIMATE SACRIFICE
FOR THE LIBERATION OF THE MARIANAS.

1941-1945

Santiago Surrender Tree

The Santiago Surrender Tree is located in Santiago, Cuba.   The monument marks the site at which Spanish forces surrendered Santiago de Cuba to United States forces on July 17, 1898 during the Spanish American War.   On July 1, U.S. and Cuban troops had taken El Viso Fort, the town of El Caney and San Juan heights, and San Juan Hill was taken at the same time, with the help of the Rough Riders under Teddy Roosevelt.  These vistories opened the way to Santiago de Cuba.  Clara Barton, founder of the American Red Cross, was among those who cared for the wounded at Santiago.  

By Act of Congress, the Santiago Surrender Tree became the responsibility of the American Battle Monuments Commission on July 1, 1958.  The tree has since died, but the cannon and plaques continue to mark the surrender site.

Sommepy Monument

The World War I Sommepy American Monument stands on Blank Mont Ridge, three miles northwest of Sommepy-Tahure (Marne), France.  The site is 11 miles north of Suippes and 124 miles east of Paris.  It can be reached via Chalons-sur-Marne or Reims.

The monument is surrounded by vestiges of World War I trenches, dugouts and gun emplacements.  It is essentially a tower of golden-yellow limestone with an observation tower on top affording an excellent view of the battlefields.  Weather permitting, it is open daily.  Inside the entrance to the monument is an inscription describing American operations in the vicinity.  The monument's site was captured by American troops.  It commemorates the achievements of the 70,000 Americans who served in this region during the summer and fall of 1918.

Souilly Marker

On the outside of the town hall of Souilly, France is a bronze tablet identifying this building as the headquarters of the American First Army towards the end of World War I. Inscribed in French and English is the following:

HEADQUARTERS OF THE AMERICAN FIRST ARMY
OCCUPIED THIS BUILDING FROM SEPTEMBER 21, 1918
TO THE END OF HOSTILITIES, AND FROM HERE
CONDUCTED THE MEUSE-ARGONNE OFFENSIVE,
ONE OF THE GREATEST OPERATIONS OF THE WAR.


Tours Monument

The World War I Tours American Monument located in the city of Tours, France, 146 miles southwest of Paris.

The monument commemorates the efforts of the 650,000 men who served during World War I in the Services of Supply of the American Expeditionary Forces and whose work behind the battle lines made possible the achievements of the American Armies in the field.  It is located just east of the southern end of the Pont Wilson which crosses the Loire River in prolongation of the main street (Rue National) of Tours, and consists of a handsome fountain of white stone with a gold gilded statue of an American Indian holding an eagle.  The surrounding area was developed into a small park by the Commission.


Utah Beach Monument

The World War II Utah Beach American Memorial is located at the termination of Highway N-13D, approximately a mile and a half northeast of Sainte-Marie-du-Mont (Manche), France. This monument commemorates the achievements of the American Forces of the VII Corps who landed and fought in the liberation of the Cotentin Peninsula from June 6, 1944 to July 1, 1944.

The memorial consists of a red granite obelisk surrounded by a small developed park overlooking the historic sand dunes of Utah Beach, one of the two American landing beaches during the Normandy invasion of June 6, 1944.

West Coast Memorial

The World War II West Coast Memorial is located on a high ground overlooking the entrance to San Francisco Harbor. It is at the intersection of Lincoln and Harrison Boulevards in the Presidio of San Francisco, California, near the southern edge of the Golden Gate Bridge.

This memorial was erected in the memory of those soldiers, sailors, marines and coast guardsmen, and airmen who met their deaths in the American coastal waters of the Pacific Ocean during World War II. It consists of a curved gray granite wall decorated with bas relief sculpture and a statue of Liberty on its right flank. On the wall are inscribed the name, rank, organization and State of each of the 412 American missing whose remains were never recovered or identified. The terrace affords an excellent view of the neighboring shore and the exit from the Golden Gate Bridge to the Pacific Ocean.


Western Task Force Marker

The Western Naval Task Force Marker at Casablanca, Morocco is located at the Ben M'Sick civilian cemetery.   The bronze plaque, mounted on a solid block of Moroccan granite, commemorates the U.S. Western Task Force, which successfully made assault landings at Mohemmedia, Safi and Kenitra on November 8-11, 1942.   This was the first ever trans-oceanic amphibious operation, which embarked from Hampton Roads, Virginia, and was comprised of American troops that were transported and supported by 100 naval vessels.   The landings were made near Casablanca on the Atlantic coast of French Morocco.


 

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