Z SQUARE 7, A B-29 TRUE STORY

Z SQUARE 7 CREW MILITARY FUNERAL

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The Z Square 7 Crew
Z Square 7 Crew Families
Z Square 7 Crew Cemeteries.
Missing Air Crew Report
Z Square 7 Crew Military Funeral
Memorial Lt Eugene M. Thomas Jr (Marion, Al)
Memorial Lt Francis X. Glacken (Cambridge, MA)
Memorial Lt Norman B. Bassett (Cornell University, Ithaca, NY)
Marcia Bassett McGrattan
Memorial Sgt George P. Demers (Lynn, MA)
Memorial Sgt George P. Demers (Lynn, MA)
Peter & Lillian Demers/Charlotte (Demers) Fiasconaro
Memorial Sgt Louis A. Dorio (Clarksville, VA)
HIRE OUR VETERANS!
POW-MIA-KIA Ceremony
500th Bomb Group, 73rd Wing Honor Roll
Bill Mauldin With Willie And Joe
Father John McBride
S/Sgt Kenneth O. Eslick with Photo Album
Sgt Jesse S. Klein. 41-13180
Frank Farr & Merseburg, Germany
"Lili Marlene" The Song!
"Lili Marlene" The B-17
"Lily Marlene" The B-24
"Lili Marlene" The B-24
Ivan Fail Introduction and "Long Before The Guns And Tanks."
Ivan Fail's "Tribute to the Queen"
American Battle Monuments Commission - Cemeteries
American Battle Monuments Commission - Memorials
NATIONAL WORLD WAR II MEMORIAL
THE MARINE CORPS WAR MEMORIAL (IWO JIMA )
KOREAN WAR VETERANS MEMORIAL
VIETNAM VETERANS MEMORIAL
M/Sgt Roy P. Benavidez, Vietnam Medal Of Honor
Frank Farr Poetry "November 2, 1944", "Old Men And The War", " Merseburg"
Some Pictures of World War 2
Zachary Taylor Nat'l Cemetery Memorial Pages Introduction
Zachary Taylor Nat'l Cemetery Memorial Crew Index
Zachary Taylor Nat'l Cemetery Memorial Page 1
Zachary Taylor Nat'l Cemetery Memorial Page 2
Zachary Taylor Nat'l Cemetery Memorial Page 3
Zachary Taylor Nat'l Cemetery Memorial Page 4
Zachary Taylor Nat'l Cemetery Memorial Page 5
Zachary Taylor Nat'l Cemetery Memorial Page 6
Zachary Taylor Nat'l Cemetery Memorial Page 7
Zachary Taylor Nat'l Cemetery Memorial Page 8
Zachary Taylor Nat'l Cemetery Memorial Page 9
Zachary Taylor Nat'l Cemetery Memorial Page 10
Zachary Taylor Nat'l Cemetery Memorial Page 11
Zachary Taylor Nat'l Cemetery Memorial Page 12
Zachary Taylor Nat'l Cemetery Memorial Page 13
Zachary Taylor Nat'l Cemetery Memorial Page 14
Zachary Taylor Nat'l Cemetery Memorial Page 15
Zachary Taylor Nat'l Cemetery Memorial Page 16
Zachary Taylor Nat'l Cemetery Memorial Page 17
Zachary Taylor Nat'l Cemetery Memorial Page 18
Zachary Taylor Nat'l Cemetery Memorial Page 19
Zachary Taylor Nat'l Cemetery Memorial Page 20
Zachary Taylor Nat'l Cemetery Memorial Page 21
Zachary Taylor Nat'l Cemetery Memorial Page 22
Zachary Taylor Nat'l Cemetery Memorial Page 23
Zachary Taylor Nat'l Cemetery Memorial Page 24
Zachary Taylor Nat'l Cemetery Memorial Page 25
Zachary Taylor Nat'l Cemetery Memorial Page - B29 Superfortress
Zachary Taylor Nat'l Cemetery Memorial Page - B26 Marauder
Zachary Taylor Nat'l Cemetery Memorial Page - B25 Mitchell
Zachary Taylor Nat'l Cemetery Memorial Page - B24 Liberator
Zachary Taylor Nat'l Cemetery Memorial Page - B17 Flying Fortress
Zachary Taylor Nat'l Cemetery Memorial Page - C87 Liberator Express
Zachary Taylor Nat'l Cemetery Memorial Page - PBM-5 Mariner
Zachary Taylor Nat'l Cemetery Memorial Page - A20 Havoc Attack Bomber
Zachary Taylor Nat'l Cemetery Memorial Page - C47 Transport
Zachary Taylor Nat'l Cemetery Memorial Page - P61 Black Widow
Zachary Taylor Nat'l Cemetery Memorial Page - A26 Invader
GIVE OUR VETERANS JOBS!!
Ivan Fail's "The Tuskegee Airmen"
Airmen Medal Of Honor Memorial
Memorial Page #1
Memorial Page #2
Memorial Page #3
Memorial Page #4
Memorial Page #5
Memorial Page #6
The Navajo Code Talkers & Native American Medals Of Honor
Ivan Fail's "D Day, The Normandy Invasion"
B-29 Crew Positions & Specifications
About The Book
C. Clayton Thompson Bookseller
Ivan Fail's "When The Mustangs Came"
Contacts
Ivan Fail "The Eighteen Wheeler's Hymn"
Awards
Lompoc Veterans Memorial Building with photo album
Ivan Fail's "Against All Odds - Mission Complete"
Ford Tolbert by Sallyann
Ford Tolbert Pictures
A Tribute to Lt Raymond "Hap" Halloran
Lt Raymond "Hap" Halloran
Colonel Gregory "Pappy" Boyington, USMC, The Black Sheep Squadron
Lt Halloran Eulogy for Colonel Boyington
Omori POW Camp
Ivan Fail's "A Salute To Lt. Holguin"/ "Shoo Shoo Baby"
Great Bend, Kansas B-29 Memorial
General Lemay's biography including a B-29 nose art photo album
THE GENERAL AND MRS CURTIS LEMAY FOUNDATION
March 9 and 10, 1945 Over Tokyo
Lt "Hap" Halloran on March 10, 1945
General Earl Johnson
General Earl Johnson Biography
313th Bomb Wing Mining Missions
Lt Robert Copeland, copilot, Z Square 8
Pyote Bomber Base With A Photo Album
History of "Diamond Lil" With A Photo Album
History of "FIFI" With A Photo Album
"Hap" Halloran induction Combat Airman Hall of Fame
Blackie Blackburn with a photo album
Hap's Memorable Flight On FIFI
C. Douglas Caffey, A WW2 Veteran, Book Of Poetry
C. Douglas Caffey Collection Of Poetry
Page 1
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Page 3
Page 4
Page 5
Page 6
Page 7
Page 8
Page 9
Page 10
Page 11
Page 12
Page 13
Page 14
Page 15
Page 16
Page 17
Page 18
Page 19
Page 20
Page 21
Page 22
Page 23
Page 24
Page 25
Page 26
Page 27
Page 28
Page 29
Page 30
Page 31
Page 32
Page 33
C. Douglas Caffey on Post Traumatic Stress Disorder
C. Douglas Caffey With More on PTSD
C. Douglas Caffey Memorial Day Flying The Flag
C. Douglas Caffey Saying Goodbye To America
OUR VETERANS NEED WORK!
Pearl Harbor with Photo Album
The Pacific Theater
Battle of Saipan, Mariana Islands
Saipan Medals of Honor
Battle of Tinian, Mariana Islands
Tinian Medals of Honor
Battle of Guam, Mariana Islands
Guam Medals of Honor
Battle of Iwo Jima
Iwo Jima Medals of Honor
Cpl Ira Hayes, USMC
Battle of Okinawa
Okinawa Medals of Honor
Japanese Surrender
Navy Ships At Surrender Ceremonies
Ivan Fail's "The Saga Of The Superfortress"
Ivan Fail's "The Silent Sentries"
Last Page

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Zachary Taylor National Cemetery
Louisville, Kentucky
 
Section E, Grave 179

An example of the military funeral ceremony given the Z Square 7 crew at the Zachary Taylor National Cemetery is shown here. While there may have been a few minor changes to the ceremony because of the weather conditions, but basically the protocol honoring these men remained the same. Family members attending the funeral services included my stepfather, Peter Demers from Lynn, Ma. as well as Lt. Robert Phillips, the only survivor of the Z Square 7 crew.

The weather in Louisville, Ky on Tuesday, October 4, 1949 was 67 degrees with rain and fog. The weather got increasingly rainy and foggy for the next few days as the effects of a hurricane were felt. Hurricane #10 went on shore in Louisiana as a Category 4 but quickly dissipated to a tropical storm and a tropical depression by the time it reached the Chicago area.

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Rostrum (pavilion) at the Zachary Taylor National Cemetery

M/Sgt Armstrong’s son remembers attending the interment services at the Zachary Taylor National Cemetery. He recalls, “I was at the funeral for the crew in Louisville. My grandparent took me there from San Antonio. Of course I was very young and remember only bits and pieces. I remember the rifle shots and the old pavilion where the services were held. I have the most vivid recollections of the drive as it was the first time I’d been anywhere. It stormed and flooded the whole way there.”

The band plays as mourners arrive and take their seats.

The hearse arrives at the gravesite.

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When the families are ready to proceed, the non-commissioned officer-in-charge (NCOIC) will signal the pallbearers to withdraw the casket from the hearse and carry it to the grave.

 

On NCOIC command, all detail participants (except for the pallbearers) will come to “Attention” and “Present Arms” as the casket is carried to the grave.

The band plays a hymn as the casket is removed from the hearse.

Chaplain leads the way to gravesite, followed by casket team.

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The pallbearers carry the casket, feet first, to the grave. Upon reaching the grave, the casket is placed on the lowering device. After the casket is placed over the grave, the pallbearers march from the casket to become the firing party. They execute a facing movement and march off in two ranks toward the designated firing party location.  While marching, the pallbearers merge into single file in order to form one rank, 45 degrees off the foot of the casket.  The firing party commander is positioned on the opposite flank or centered to the rear of the formation.  At that time, the firing party commander will command the firing party to unstack their weapons, which have been pre-positioned under guard at the gravesite.  

 

All detail participants will “Order Arms” after the casket has been placed on the lowering device.

The NCOIC ensures the flag is stretched out and level, and centered over the casket. When the U.S. flag covers the casket, it is placed so the union blue field is at the head and over the left shoulder. It is not placed in the grave and is not allowed to touch the ground.

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When the casket is placed over the grave, the band commander "Cuts Off" the band, "Faces About", and "Salutes". Instruments remain in playing position. The NCOIC commands "Order Arms" and the band commander and drum major terminate their salutes. Band members execute "Instruments Down" on the command of  "Order Arms."

The NCOIC moves from his place at the head of the casket in order to permit the chaplain to conduct the graveside service. He should move to a location where he still faces the family, but does not interfere with the service. 

During the religious service, all the detail participants go to “Parade Rest" on command.

The Chaplain performs the religious service and concludes with the Benediction.

Chaplain concludes his service and backs away from the head of the grave. The NCOIC and assistant will assume the chaplain’s position at the head of the grave and all detail participants will come to the position of “Attention” followed by "Escort, Present Arms". The band commander and drum major "Salute". The mourners are asked to stand for the rendering of honors.

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On the Rifle Detail Leader’s command "Ready! Aim! Fire!" each rifle volley will be fired. The firing party fires three volleys and, at the command of the Rifle Detail Leader, assumes the position of “Present Arms.”

     

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Immediately after the firing party has been brought to "Present Arms", the bugler sounds “Taps”.

At the conclusion of "Taps", the bugler "Salutes"and holds his salute until the firing party is brought to order arms.

The firing party comes to "Order Arms" at the command of the firing party commander, and restack their weapons in a ceremonial manner.  After the stacking of weapons is completed, the firing party forms into two ranks and marches in the most direct route back to the lowering device platform so they can perform the ceremonial folding of the interment flag. The NCOIC asks the mourners to be seated. The band plays appropriate music as the flag is folded.

"The flag folding ceremony represents the same religious principles on which our country was originally founded. The portion of the flag denoting honor is the canton of blue containing the stars representing the states our veterans served in uniform. The canton field of blue dresses from left to right and is inverted when draped as a pall on a casket of a veteran who has served our country in uniform.

In the Armed Forces of the United States, at the ceremony of retreat the flag is lowered, folded in a triangle fold and kept under watch throughout the night as a tribute to our nation's honored dead. The next morning it is brought out and, at the ceremony of reveille, run aloft as a symbol of our belief in the resurrection of the body."

The pallbearers raise the flag from the casket and hold it in a horizontal position waist high and complete the folding sequence without letting the flag touch the casket and the Senior Pallbearer reciting "Why The American Flag Is Folded Thirteen Times!"

 

                      The first fold of our flag is a symbol of life. 

               The second fold is a symbol of our belief in eternal life. 

              The third fold is made in honor and remembrance of the veterans departing our ranks who gave a portion of their lives for the defense of our country to attain peace throughout the world. 

               The fourth fold represents our weaker nature, for as American citizens trusting in God, it is to Him we turn in times of peace as well as in time of war for His divine guidance. 

               The fifth fold is a tribute to our country, for in the words of Stephen Decatur, "Our Country, in dealing with other countries, may she always be right; but it is still our country, right or wrong." 

              The sixth fold is for where our hearts lie. It is with our heart that we pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States Of America, and to the Republic for which it stands, one Nation under God, indivisible, with Liberty and Justice for all. 

              The seventh fold is a tribute to our Armed Forces, for it is through the Armed Forces that we protect our country and our flag against all her enemies, whether they be found within or without the boundaries of our republic. 

             The eighth fold is a tribute to the one who entered into the valley of the shadow of death, that we might see the light of day, and to honor mother, for whom it flies on Mother's Day. 

             The ninth fold is a tribute to womanhood; for it has been through their faith, their love, loyalty and devotion that the character of the men and women who have made this country great has been molded. 

             The tenth fold is a tribute to the father, for he, too, has given his sons and daughters for the defense of our country since they were first born. 

             The eleventh fold, in the eyes of a Hebrew citizen represents the lower portion of the seal of King David and King Solomon, and glorifies in their eyes, the God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob. 

             The twelfth fold, in the eyes of a Christian citizen, represents an emblem of eternity and glorifies, in their eyes, God the Father, the Son, and Holy Spirit. 

               When the flag is completely folded, the stars are uppermost reminding us of our nation's motto, "In God We Trust".

 

After the flag is completely folded and tucked in, it takes on the appearance of a cocked hat, ever reminding us of the soldiers who served under General George Washington, and the sailors and marines who served under Captain John Paul Jones, who were followed by their comrades and shipmates in the Armed Forces of the United States, preserving for us the rights, privileges, and freedoms we enjoy today.

 

As the flag is folded, it is passed to the senior pallbearer at the head of the casket, who makes the final tuck.

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After the flag is folded, the senior pallbearer executes a "Right Face" and places the flag at chest level into the hands of the NCOIC.  The NCOIC salutes the flag for three seconds before accepting it from the senior pallbearer.  The senior pallbearer salutes the flag for three seconds after presenting it to the NCOIC.  The NCOIC then moves by the most direct route to the chaplain who is to receive the flag.

The Casket team leaves the gravesite.

The chaplain will present a flag to each family. 

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"On behalf of the President of the United States, the Department of the Air Force, and a grateful nation, we offer this flag for the faithful and dedicated service of  1/Lt Eugene M. Thomas Jr, 2/Lt Francis X. Glacken, 2/Lt Norman B. Bassett, 1/Lt William H. Hain, M/Sgt Richard C. Armstrong, T/Sgt Bishop K. Mitchell Jr, S/Sgt Sam H. Bradford, Sgt John F. Slater, Sgt George P. Demers, and Sgt Louis A. Dorio. God bless you, God bless their families, and God bless the United States of America."

The Chaplain and the NCOIC offer condolences to the immediate families and other mourners seated in the front row.

Once condolences have been offered, the NCOIC will return to the cortege arrival point and await the departure of the cortege. The bugler, pallbearers, and band remain in position until the families move from the gravesite. After the presentation is completed, the NCOIC marches the pallbearers and the bugler away from the gravesite and toward the stacked weapons. At the first "Halt", the rifles of the firing party are then cleared and inspected, which concludes the ceremony.

On the command of the NCOIC the entire formation faces the direction of march and all units move from the gravesite. 

A military guard remains with the casket until it is lowered.   

 

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